Common Cents Mission: Common Cents, creator of the Penny Harvest, nurtures a new generation of caring and capable young people between the ages of four and 24 by enabling them to strengthen their communities through philanthropy and service-learning.

Penny Harvest location: 

Join the Common Cents email list!
Donate to Common Cents and the Penny Harvest!
Tell A Friend about Common Cents and the Penny Harvest!

Seattle
Run for Change!
Penny Harvest Field

Search the Common Cents and Penny Harvest web site  

Penny Harvest Report

Bookmark and Share


Commentaries
Working Together to Help
I enjoyed being a part of the Penny Harvest during my fourth grade school year at Roessleville. What I enjoyed most was being able to help groups in the community, such as The Ronald McDonald House, the animal shelter and the Juvenile Diabetes Association.

What I learned while working with the other fourth grade students in this program is that it feels so good to give back to the community.
Click here to read more talk
Instant Poll
Who do you think should be responsible for teaching our children to be good citizens?
Families
Schools
Religious institutions
Educational programs (like the Penny Harvest!)
All of the above

Solid Ground
administers the Penny Harvest in Seattle/King County in coordination with Common Cents

Penny Harvest Seattle


Home > Penny Harvest > Location > Seattle

What's New at Common Cents and the Penny Harvest

Making a difference at Adams Elementary School (video)
Click here to view a video made by Adams Students celebrating their harvest!
Click here to view the video used to kick-off this year's harvest at Adams!

 

 

See more of What's New

Seattle Penny Harvesters lead by example!

Although most of Penny Harvest schools in Seattle donated their funds to local non-profit organizations, the students at Hawthorne Elementary chose a different course of action: helping a homeless man, DeBraer Brae get housing. Brae now has a wheelchair and temporary housing thanks to donations of spare change from students at Seattle's Hawthorne Elementary.

Students scrounge for idle pennies

Last week 58 schools in the area joined over 1,000 schools nationwide - and nearly 500,000 students - as they began scouring their homes and neighborhoods for idle pennies.
18th Annual Penny Harvest Kicks-off!

October 27, 2008 - Starting today, over 1,000 schools nationwide - and nearly 500,000 students - will be scouring their homes and neighborhoods for idle pennies. From now until Thanksgiving, students will go door-to-door with their parents asking neighbors to help them better their communities by donating spare change. During the next four weeks, millions of pennies will be collected by Penny Harvesters, and thousands of Penny Harvesters will connect with their communities.
View from the helm

Puget Soundkeeper Alliance Director Sue Joerger reflects on accepting a Penny Harvest Grant from Adams Elementary School.
Students at Brighton Elementary help animals in need

Proving their compassion for animals, this was the second year in a row that PAWS received a grant from Brighton.




Did You Know?
Pennies made from 1793 to 1837 were pure copper. Today the alloy is 97.5% zinc and only 2.5% copper.
Click here to read more factoids!


 

 
Back to top
 

Home | Contact Us | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Web Credits


 

Close Window
Close Window
Close Window